Edgar Allan Poe

1809 - 1849

A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on day and dreams

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Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things that escape those who dream only at night.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on day, dreams, eternity, and vision

They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night. In their grey visions they obtain glimpses of eternity.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: Eleonora, 1841

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe

Glitter, and in that one word how much of all that is detestable do we express.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on glory

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To the glory that was Greece And the grandeur that was Rome.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: To Helen.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on doubt

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It may well be doubted whether human ingenuity can construct an enigma . . . which human ingenuity may not, by proper application, resolve.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: The Gold Bug

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on life, misery, quiet, rest, soul, time, and tragedy

Finally on Sunday morning, October 7, 1849, "He became quiet and seemed to rest for a short time. Then, gently, moving his head, he said, "Lord help my poor soul." As he had lived so he died-in great misery and tragedy.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: Last Words

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on disaster

Whom unmerciful disaster Followed fast and followed faster.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: The Raven.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on writers

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To speak algebraically, Mr. M. is execrable, but Mr. G. is (x + 1)- ecrable. [Discussing fellow writers Cornelius Mathews and William Ellery Channing.]

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC: Rome Press Inc., 1988.

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A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on blush, borrowing, desires, grace, love, play, praise, security, and soul

The Merchant, to Secure His Treasure The merchant, to secure his treasure, Conveys it in a borrowed name: Euphelia serves to grace my measure, But Cloe is my real flame. My softest verse, my darling lyre Upon Euphelia's toilet lay - When Cloe noted her desire That I should sing, that I should play. My lyre I tune, my voice I raise, But with my numbers mix my sighs; And whilst I sing Euphelia's praise, I fix my soul on Cloe's eyes. Fair Cloe blushed; Euphelia frowned: I sung, and gazed; I played, and trembled: And Venus to the Loves around Remarked how ill we all dissembled.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: The Merchant, to Secure His Treasure

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Edgar Allan Poe on justice

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Perched upon a bust of Pallas, just above my chamber door,- Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)

Source: The Raven.

Contributed by: Zaady

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