Dean Radin

A Quote by Dean Radin on phenomenon, psi, and paranormal

“After a century of increasingly sophisticated investigations and more than a thousand controlled studies with combined odds against chance of 10 to the 104th power to 1, there is now strong evidence that psi phenomena exist.  While this is an impressive statistic, all it means is that the outcomes of these experiments are definitely not due to coincidence.  We’ve considered other common explanations like selective reporting and variations in experimental quality, and while those factors do moderate the overall results, there can be no little doubt that overall something interesting is going on.  It seems increasingly likely that as physics continues to redefine our understanding of the fabric of reality, a theoretical outlook for a rational explanation for psi will eventually be established.”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 275

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on quantum zeno effect, zeno effect, observation, state, and collapsed state

[Physicist Henry Stapp of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.]

            “How does the mid/brain cause one particular line of thought, or decision, to be sustained over another?  Stapp offers an intriguing speculation based on the Quantum Zeno Effect.  This refers to a prediction (since confirmed by experiments) that  the act of rapidly observing a quantum system forces that system to remain in its wavelike, indeterminate state, rather than to collapse into a particular, determined state.  As Stapp says,

            ‘Taken to the extreme, observing continuously whether an atom is in a certain state keeps it in that state forever.  For this reason, the Quantum Zeno Effect is also known as the watched pot effect.  The mere act of rapidly asking questions of a quantum system freezes it in a particular state, preventing it from evolving as it would if we weren’t peeking.  Simply observing a quantum system suppresses certain of its transitions to other states.’”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 259

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on macro entanglement, entanglement, and evidence



“I believe we will continue to find increasingly strong
reasons to believe that some of the strange effects observable in the
microscopic world exist not only in the exotic realms, but also in more
intimate domain of human experience.  I
also believe that the implications of all this for understanding psi are
sufficiently remote from engrained ways of thinking that the first reaction
will be confidence that it’s wrong.  The
second will be horror that it might be right. 
The third will be boredom because it’s obvious….”


Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 209

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on classic physics, physic, determinism, causality, locality, reality, time, and space

Classical physics rests upon five basic assumptions about the fabric of reality:  reality, locality, causality, and determinism.  These assumptions were postulated to take place within a framework of an absolute fixed space and time.  It was also taken for granted that the mathematical descriptions of physical processes corresponded to the actual behavior of objective events.

            The assumption of reality refers to the idea that the physical world is objectively real.  That means it exists independently of whether anyone is observing it.  The moon is still there even if you aren’t looking at it.  Locality refers to the idea that the only way that objects can be influenced is through direct contact.  Unmediated action at a distance is prohibited, as this is uncomfortably close to the occult suggestion that invisible spirits can cause things to occur, and the occult concepts are anathema to science.

            Causality assumed that the arrow of time points in one direction, and thus that cause → effect sequences are absolutely fixed.  Continuity assumes that there are no discontinuous jumps in nature or in that the fabric of space and time is “smooth.”  Determinism assumes that, as Einstein once quipped, ‘God does not play dice with the universe,’ meaning that things progress in an orderly, predictable way.  We might not be smart enough or know enough to predict everything, but determinism says that in principle we can predict the future completely if we knew all the starting conditions and causal linkages.

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 210

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on history of psi, psi, and paranormal

“And this is why studying the history of psi is important.  People have been reporting these phenomena for millennia and studying them for centuries.  Human experiences that continue to be repeated throughout history and across cultures, are not due to ignorance or lack of critical thinking, and demand a serious explanation.”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 53

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on selective reporting, studies, and esp

Some have proposed that the practice of selective reporting, or publishing only successful studies and filing away the unsuccessful ones, can explain the overall results of these tests.  But analyses show that of the 188 experiments described in Rhine’s 1940 book, Extrasensory Perception after Sixty Years, the combined results are so far from chance that it would take 428,000 unreported studies averaging a chance effect to eliminate the results of the known 188 experiments.  Given that it took 60 years to produce those 188 experiments, or about 3 studies per year, at that rate the missing studies would have taken 137,000 years to produce.

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 84..5

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on bias, rational man mistake, prejudice, rational, and evidence

            “… ‘You’re making the ‘rational man’ mistake.’  He meant that we usually assume that science is a rational process, but it’s not.  When we’re presented with evidence that counters our prior beliefs, instead of the new evidence swaying us toward a new or revised belief, it tends to reaffirm our prior beliefs.  Well, I thought, that’s completely ridiculous.  It’s got to be a mistake.  Unfortunately, after witnessing precisely these reactions to the data for twenty years, I have reluctantly concluded that the ‘rational man’ hypothesis is indeed false.

            The technical term for one form of this irrational phenomena is the ‘confirmation bias.’  This psychological quirk causes evidence supporting your beliefs to be perceived as plausible, and evidence challenging your beliefs to be perceived as implausible.  Studies in social psychology have repeatedly demonstrated that journal reviewers invariably judge articles being submitted got publication according to their prior beliefs.  Those who agree with a hypothesis tend to judge a paper reporting positive results as an excellent piece of work, and those who disagree judge the very same paper and a flawed failure.  The former referees recommend publication and the latter don’t.  The final decision to publish is left up to the editor, so if the editor doesn’t happen to agree with the paper’s hypothesis then there’s a good chance it won’t appear on the journal.  And then the evidence doesn’t exist as far as the rest of the scientific community is concerned.  In science, this tends to create a genteel ‘good old boys’ club of acceptable ideas, while unacceptable ideas are consigned to the biker’s bar lounge on the wrong side of the tracks.  Fortunately, most scientists also tend to have high curiosity, so the club’s rules can change with sufficient persistence (and after the retirement of some of the older good old boys).

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 101..2

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on unknown, exploration, and open mind

“Maintaining an open mind is essential when exploring the unknown, but allowing one’s brains to fall out in the process is inadvisable.”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 208

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on ignorance theory, education, psi, and extrasensory perception

[The ignorance theory]

“A 2001 nationwide poll cited in the NSF’s [National Science Foundation] 2002 report asked the question, ‘Some people possess psychic powers or ESP.  DO you strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree?’  This NSF-sponsored survey found that 60% of adult Americans agreed or strongly agreed with the statement.  Earlier Gallup polls taken in 1990, 1996, and 2001 showed that these percentages have been increasing over time.  These figures were presented in the context of demonstrating the deplorable state of science education in the United States.

            This would indeed be discouraging, except that the report tiptoes around an interesting fact.  When survey respondents were separated by education level, 46% with less than a high school education agreed that some people possess ESP, but a whopping 62% with high school or more education agreed.  Among the ‘attentive public,’ those defined as ‘very interested’ in a topic, ‘very well informed’ about it, and regularly read a daily newspaper or relevant national magazine, a healthy majority of 59% agreed.  Thus, the survey actually revealed that belief in ESP was not explainable as a matter of poor education.

            To check the NSF’s findings, I examined data collected by the National Opinions Research Center, which is affiliated with the University of Chicago.  This Center, one of the oldest academic survey research groups in the United States, collects in its annual General Social Survey  a wide range of questions used to form a snapshot of opinions in the United States.  One of the questions asked over the years has been about psi.  The specific question I was interested in asks: ‘How often have you felt as though you were in touch with someone when they were far away from you?’  The possible answers ranged from ‘never in my life’ to ‘often.’  I compared those answers to questions on education achievement, which ranged from 0 –20 years of formal education.  The ignorance hypothesis predicts a negative relationship – the more education you have, the less you should believe in psi.  The actual result, based on 3,880 survey responses, was not negative.  In fact, it was significantly positive, with odds against chance of 80 to 1.  This is not just the case in the United States.  The same trend has been observed in Australia, France, and virtually every other country that has reported these surveys.  This finding is even widely acknowledged by skeptics, who gnash their teeth about it.”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 38..9

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Dean Radin on blindness, attention, perception, focus, gorilla suit, and blind spot

            “Beliefs can easily cause us to become blind to the obvious.  Recent research on ‘inattentional blindness’ has shown that even minor tweaks to one’s expectations can cause a form of blindness.  A simple experiment developed by University of Illinois psychologist Daniel Simons provided a dramatic demonstration of this effect.  …

            Simon’s experiment consists of a twenty-five second video clip of six people playing a basketball game.  Three are dressed in white T-shirts and three in black T-shirts.  The white team is passing a basketball amongst themselves, and the black team is doing likewise.  During the game, a person dressed in a black gorilla suit calmly walks into the middle of the game, beats its chest, and then walks off.  The gorilla is not understated or camouflaged – it’s blatantly obvious.  And yet the majority of people viewing the clip do not see the gorilla provided they’re given a very simple instruction:  count the number of basketballs tossed between the members wearing white T-shirts.  This minor deflection of attention is enough to cause complete blindness to something as obvious as a gorilla.  The power of deflecting attention is well known to stage magicians, who specialize in creating such illusions.”

Dean Radin

Source: Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality, Pages: 43..4

Contributed by: HeyOK

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