David Berman

A Quote by David Berman on self and conversation

There is a person whose acquaintance and conversation I do earnestly recommend unto you as thing of the greatest advantage: you will be surprised when I tell you it is yourself.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 50

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on study and commitment

Spend regularly and constantly two or three hours of the morning in study and retirement. I do not take upon me to prescribe what you shall employ yourself about. I only propose the passing two or three hours of the twenty-four in private.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 50

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on language, things, perception, philosophy, linguistics, and psychology

Language is virtually always pathological; hence the solution is to move as fast and far as possible from language to experience, from linguistic to experimental or psychological philosophy. In order to know that we are not in the linguistic maze, we need to determine, according to Berkeley, whether the things we are talking about exist; hence we need to look for the relevant perceptions. For him, this usually means retiring into himself and trying to imagine whether x exists, having formed the best definition possible of x.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 43

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on images, mind, perspective, and visual

It would be wrong of me to suppose that just because I can form private mental images, that everyone can. As Francis Galton and William James long ago showed, a small proportion of adults--and some of these extremely intelligent--are unable to form such visual images. Berkeley's point is that it would be equally arrogant for these non-thinkers or non-image formers to claim that everyone is like them in the relevant respect. The temptation to pontificate in that way reveals a narrowness and unwillingness to see the world from another perspective.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 49

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on manner, opinion, and reconcile

He that would win another over to his opinion must seem to harmonize with him at first and humour him in his own way of talking. From my childhood I had an unaccountable turn of thought that way.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 49

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on words, thought, and idea

For it oft happens that a notion, when it is cloathed with words, seems tedious and operose and hard to be conceived, which yet being striped of that garniture, the ideas shrink into a narrow compass, and are viewed almost by one glance of thought.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 41

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on principle, words, knowledge, and consequence

Unless we take care to clear the first principles of knowledge from the incumbrance and delusion of words, we may make infinite reasonings upon them to no purpose. We may deduce consequences, and never be the wiser.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 42

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on sight, knowledge, perception, and sense

Suppose one who had always continued blind be told by his guide that after he has advanced so many steps he shall come to the brink of a precipice, or be stopped by a wall; must not this to him seem very admirable and surprising? He cannot conceive how it is possible for mortals to frame such predictions as these, which to him would seem as strange and unaccountable as prophesy doth to others. Even they who are blessed with the visive faculty may (though familiarity make it less observed) find therein sufficient cause of admiration.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 29

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman

Consider the case of an intelligence, or unbodied spirit, which is supposed to see perfectly well, i.e. to have a clear perception of the proper and immediate objects of sight, but to have no sense of touch.~ Let us now examine what proficiency such a one may be able to make in geometry...

First, then, it is certain the aforesaid intelligence could have no idea of a solid, or quantity of three dimensions, which followeth from its not having any idea of distance. We indeed are prone to think that we have by sight the ideas of space and solids, which ariseth from our imagining that we do, strictly speaking, see distance and some parts of an object at a greater distance than others; which have been demonstrated to be the effect of the experience we have had, what ideas of touch are connected with such and such ideas attending vision: but the intelligence here spoken of is supposed to have no experience of touch.~ Whence it is plain he can have no notion of those parts of geometry which relate to the mensuration of solids.~ Nor it is an easier matter for him to conceive the placing of one plain or angle on another, in order to prove their equality: Since that supposeth some idea of distance or external space. All which makes it evident our pure intelligence could never attain to know so much as the first elements of plain geometry.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 30..31

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by David Berman on language, meaning, sight, mind, and world

For Berkeley (normal) vision is a language whereby God tells us about the tangible world. But prior to having experience of the tangible world, the visual language would be as meaningless as an utterly alien language. It would convey no meaning to the sighted mind.

David Berman

Source: Berkeley: The Great Philosophers (The Great Philosophers Series) (Great Philosophers (Routledge (Firm))), Pages: 33..34

Contributed by: Chris

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