Confucius

c. 551 - c. 479 BC

A Quote by Confucius on bravery, courage, and good

A good man will certainly also possess courage; but a brave man is not necessarily good.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on courage and principles

To see what is right, and not do it, is want of courage, or of principle.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on vulgarity

A gentleman considers what is right; The vulgar consider what will pay.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on cowardice

To know what is right and not to do it is the worst cowardice.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on slander and elightenment

He who is influenced neither by the soaking in of slander nor by the assault of denunciation may indeed be called enlightened.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on difficulty

Settle one difficulty, and you keep a hundred away.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius

It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius

The injury of prodigality leads to this, that he who will not economize will have to agonize.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on friendship, good, idleness, music, pleasure, and study

There are three sorts of pleasures which are advantageous, and three which are injurious. Finding pleasure in the discriminating study of ceremonies and music, finding pleasure in discussing the good points in the conduct of others, and finding pleasure in having many wise friends, these are advantageous. But finding pleasure in profligate enjoyments, finding pleasure in idle gadding about, and finding pleasure in feasting, these are injurious.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Confucius on faults, justice, and seriousness

Just as lavishness leads easily to presumption, so does frugality to meanness. But meanness is a far less serious fault than presumption.

Confucius (c. 551 - c. 479 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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