Chuang Tzu

c.360 BC - c. 275 BC

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on control, heart, and needs

When the shoe fits, the foot is forgotten. When the belt fits, the belly is forgotten. When the heart is right, "for" and "against" are forgotten. No drives, no compulsions, no needs, no attractions: Then your affairs are under control. You are a free man.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, 19:12, pp. 166-167

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on losing, needs, water, and taoism

All the fish needs is to get lost in the water. All man needs is to get lost in Tao.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on earth and heaven

Heaven is like an egg, and the earth is like the yolk of the egg.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on emptiness, knowledge, limits, mind, and taoism

The mind remains undetermined in the great Void. Here the highest knowledge is unbounded. That which gives things their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of 'limits', we remain confined to limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called 'fullness.' The limitlessness of the limited is called 'emptiness.' Tao is the source of both. But it is itself neither fullness nor emptiness.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:6, pp. 182-183

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on death, earth, funerals, heaven, and wishes

When Chuang Tzu was about to die, his disciples signified their wish to give him a grand burial. 'I shall have heaven and earth for my coffin and its shell; the sun and moon for my two round symbols of jade, the stars and constellations for my pearls and jewels; and all things assisting as the mourners. Will not the provisions for my funeral be complete? What could you add to them?'

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on colors, conflict, eternity, nature, power, rest, secrets, vitality, and taoism

All that is limited by form, semblance, sound, color is called object. Among them all, man alone is more than an object. Though, like objects, he has form and semblance, He is not limited to form. He is more. He can attain to formlessness. When he is beyond form and semblance, beyond "this" and "that," where is the comparison with another object? Where is the conflict? What can stand in his way? He will rest in his eternal place which is no-place. He will be hidden in his own unfathomable secret. His nature sinks to its root in the One. His vitality, his power hide in secret Tao.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (19:2, pp 155-156)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on death, failure, glory, honor, joy, life, possessions, power, shame, sorrow, success, wealth, and world

Goods and possessions are no gain in his eyes. He stays far from wealth and honor. Long life is no ground for joy, nor early death for sorrow. Success is not for him to be pround of, failure is no shame. Had he all the world's power he would not hold it as his own. If he conquered everything he would not take it to himself. His glory is in knowing that all things come together in One and life and death are equal.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, (12:2, pp. 106-107)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, interest, kindness, money, poverty, pride, reward, shame, struggle, virtue, and taoism

The man in whom Tao acts without impediment harms no other being by his actions yet he does not know himself to be "kind", to be "gentle". . . . (He) does not bother with his own interests and does not despise others who do. He does not struggle to make money and does not make a virtue of poverty. He goes his way without relying on others and does not pride himself on walking alone. While he does not follow the crowd he won't complain of those who do. Rank and reward make no appeal to him; disgrace and shame do not deter him. He is not always looking for right and wrong, always deciding "Yes" or "No." The ancients said, therefore: The man of Tao remains unknown. Perfect virtue produces nothing. "No-Self" is "True-Self". And the greatest man is Nobody.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 17:3, pp. 137-138

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on knowledge

Great knowledge sees all in one. Small knowledge breaks down into the many.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:2, p. 55)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on dreams

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I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly dreaming I am a man.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu (Chinese Taoist text)

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