Chuang Tzu

c.360 BC - c. 275 BC

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on emptiness, knowledge, limits, mind, and taoism

The mind remains undetermined in the great Void. Here the highest knowledge is unbounded. That which gives things their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of 'limits', we remain confined to limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called 'fullness.' The limitlessness of the limited is called 'emptiness.' Tao is the source of both. But it is itself neither fullness nor emptiness.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:6, pp. 182-183

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, driving, failure, fighting, life, lust, men, mind, planning, serenity, sorrow, success, and taoism

The true men of old were not afraid when they stood alone in their views. No great exploits. No plans. If they failed, no sorrow. No self-congratulation in success. . . . The true men of old knew no lust for life, no dread of death. Their entrance was without gladness, their exit, yonder, without resistance. Easy come, easy go. They did not forget where from, nor ask where to, nor drive grimly forward fighting their way through life. They took life as it came, gladly; took death as it came, without care; and went away, yonder. Yonder! They had no mind to fight Tao. They did not try by their own contriving, to help Tao along. These are the ones we call true men. Minds free, thoughts gone. Brows clear, faces serene.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 6:1, pp. 89-90

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, direction, intuition, men, opposites, relationships, rest, thought, understanding, and taoism

Tao is obscured when men understand only one pair of opposites, or concentrate only on a partial aspect of being. Then clear expression also becomes muddled by mere wordplay, affirming this one aspect and denying all the rest. The pivot of Tao passes through the center where all affirmations and denials converge. He who grasps the pivot is at the still-point from which all movements and oppositions can be seen in their right relationship... Abandoning all thought of imposing a limit or taking sides, he rests in direct intuition.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:3, p. 59, p.61)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on disorder, earth, gifts, heaven, order, principles, understanding, and taoism

When we look at things in the light of Tao, nothing is best, nothing is worst. Each thing, seen in its own light stands out in its own way. It can seem to be "better" than what is compared with it on its own terms. But seen in terms of the whole, no one thing stands out as "better" ... All creatures have gifts of their own... All things have varying capacities. Consequently he who wants to have right without wrong, order without disorder, does not understand the principles of heaven and earth. He does not know how things hang together. Can a man cling only to heaven and know nothing of earth? They are correlative: to know one is to know the other. To refuse one is to refuse both.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (17:4,5,8, pp. 131-133)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on knowledge

Great knowledge sees all in one. Small knowledge breaks down into the many.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:2, p. 55)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on dreams

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I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly dreaming I am a man.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu (Chinese Taoist text)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on fame, heaven, losing, men, perception, power, thought, and wealth

Those that think that wealth is the proper thing for them cannot give up their revenues; those that seek distinction cannot give up the thought of fame; those that cleave to power cannot give the handle of it to others. While they hold their grasp of those things, they are afraid of losing them. When they let them go, they are grieved and they will not look at a single example, from which they might perceive the folly of their restless pursuits - such men are under the doom of heaven.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on age, body, creation, death, good, life, rest, universe, and work

Tzu Li went to see Tzu Lai who was dying. Leaning against the door, he said, 'Great is the Creator! What will he make of you now? Will he make you into a rat's liver? Will he make you into an insect's leg?' Tzu-Lai replied, 'The universe gave me my body so I may be carried, my life so I may work, my old age so I may repose, and my death so I may rest. To regard life as good is the way to regard death as good. . . . If I regard the universe as a great furnace and creation as a master foundryman, why should anywhere I go not be all right?'

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on body, chance, endurance, joy, and sage

We possess our body by chance and we are already pleased with it. If our physical bodies went through ten thousand transformations without end, how incomparable would this joy be! Therefore the sage roams freely in the realm in which nothing can escape, but all endures.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on death, earth, funerals, heaven, and wishes

When Chuang Tzu was about to die, his disciples signified their wish to give him a grand burial. 'I shall have heaven and earth for my coffin and its shell; the sun and moon for my two round symbols of jade, the stars and constellations for my pearls and jewels; and all things assisting as the mourners. Will not the provisions for my funeral be complete? What could you add to them?'

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

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