Chuang Tzu

c.360 BC - c. 275 BC

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on life and nature

He who knows the activities of Nature lives according to Nature.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on companions and nature

He who regards all things as one is a companion of Nature.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on nature and satisfaction

Let everything be allowed to do what it naturally does, so that its nature will be satisfied.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on beginning, cooking, dance, good, guidance, idleness, instinct, joy, life, sacred, secrets, senses, spirit, work, and taoism

Prince Wen Hui's cook was cutting up an ox. . . . The ox fell apart with a whisper. The bright cleaver murmured like a gentle wind. Rhythm! Timing! Like a sacred dance. . . . Prince Wen Hui: Good work! Your method is faultless! The cook: Method? What I follow is Tao beyond all methods! When I first began to cut up oxen I would see before me the whole ox all in one mass. After three years I no longer saw this mass. I saw the distinctions. But now I see nothing with the eye. My whole being apprehends. My senses are idle. The spirit free to work without plan follows its own instinct guided by natural line, by the secret opening, the hidden space, my cleaver finds its own way... Then I withdraw the blade, I stand still and let the joy of the work sink in. I clean the blade and put it away. Prince Wan Hui: This is it! My cook has shown me how I ought to live my own life!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (3:2, pp. 64-67)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, concern, emptiness, inaction, joy, quiet, sage, silence, stillness, and study

The non-action of the wise man is not inaction. It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything. The sage is quiet because he is not moved, not because he wills to be quiet. . . . Joy does all things without concern. For emptiness, stillness, tranquillity, tastelessness, silence, and non-action are the root of all things.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 13:1, pp. 119, 121

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on creation, good, government, nature, principles, and universe

Thus, those who say they would have right without its correlate, wrong; or good government without its correlate, misrule, do not apprehend the great principles of the universe, nor the nature of all creation.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on losing, needs, water, and taoism

All the fish needs is to get lost in the water. All man needs is to get lost in Tao.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on earth and heaven

Heaven is like an egg, and the earth is like the yolk of the egg.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on emptiness, knowledge, limits, mind, and taoism

The mind remains undetermined in the great Void. Here the highest knowledge is unbounded. That which gives things their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of 'limits', we remain confined to limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called 'fullness.' The limitlessness of the limited is called 'emptiness.' Tao is the source of both. But it is itself neither fullness nor emptiness.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:6, pp. 182-183

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, driving, failure, fighting, life, lust, men, mind, planning, serenity, sorrow, success, and taoism

The true men of old were not afraid when they stood alone in their views. No great exploits. No plans. If they failed, no sorrow. No self-congratulation in success. . . . The true men of old knew no lust for life, no dread of death. Their entrance was without gladness, their exit, yonder, without resistance. Easy come, easy go. They did not forget where from, nor ask where to, nor drive grimly forward fighting their way through life. They took life as it came, gladly; took death as it came, without care; and went away, yonder. Yonder! They had no mind to fight Tao. They did not try by their own contriving, to help Tao along. These are the ones we call true men. Minds free, thoughts gone. Brows clear, faces serene.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 6:1, pp. 89-90

Contributed by: Zaady

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