Chuang Tzu

c.360 BC - c. 275 BC

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on life and nature

He who knows the activities of Nature lives according to Nature.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on companions and nature

He who regards all things as one is a companion of Nature.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on nature and satisfaction

Let everything be allowed to do what it naturally does, so that its nature will be satisfied.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on beginning, cooking, dance, good, guidance, idleness, instinct, joy, life, sacred, secrets, senses, spirit, work, and taoism

Prince Wen Hui's cook was cutting up an ox. . . . The ox fell apart with a whisper. The bright cleaver murmured like a gentle wind. Rhythm! Timing! Like a sacred dance. . . . Prince Wen Hui: Good work! Your method is faultless! The cook: Method? What I follow is Tao beyond all methods! When I first began to cut up oxen I would see before me the whole ox all in one mass. After three years I no longer saw this mass. I saw the distinctions. But now I see nothing with the eye. My whole being apprehends. My senses are idle. The spirit free to work without plan follows its own instinct guided by natural line, by the secret opening, the hidden space, my cleaver finds its own way... Then I withdraw the blade, I stand still and let the joy of the work sink in. I clean the blade and put it away. Prince Wan Hui: This is it! My cook has shown me how I ought to live my own life!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (3:2, pp. 64-67)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, concern, emptiness, inaction, joy, quiet, sage, silence, stillness, and study

The non-action of the wise man is not inaction. It is not studied. It is not shaken by anything. The sage is quiet because he is not moved, not because he wills to be quiet. . . . Joy does all things without concern. For emptiness, stillness, tranquillity, tastelessness, silence, and non-action are the root of all things.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 13:1, pp. 119, 121

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on creation, good, government, nature, principles, and universe

Thus, those who say they would have right without its correlate, wrong; or good government without its correlate, misrule, do not apprehend the great principles of the universe, nor the nature of all creation.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, direction, intuition, men, opposites, relationships, rest, thought, understanding, and taoism

Tao is obscured when men understand only one pair of opposites, or concentrate only on a partial aspect of being. Then clear expression also becomes muddled by mere wordplay, affirming this one aspect and denying all the rest. The pivot of Tao passes through the center where all affirmations and denials converge. He who grasps the pivot is at the still-point from which all movements and oppositions can be seen in their right relationship... Abandoning all thought of imposing a limit or taking sides, he rests in direct intuition.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:3, p. 59, p.61)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on disorder, earth, gifts, heaven, order, principles, understanding, and taoism

When we look at things in the light of Tao, nothing is best, nothing is worst. Each thing, seen in its own light stands out in its own way. It can seem to be "better" than what is compared with it on its own terms. But seen in terms of the whole, no one thing stands out as "better" ... All creatures have gifts of their own... All things have varying capacities. Consequently he who wants to have right without wrong, order without disorder, does not understand the principles of heaven and earth. He does not know how things hang together. Can a man cling only to heaven and know nothing of earth? They are correlative: to know one is to know the other. To refuse one is to refuse both.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (17:4,5,8, pp. 131-133)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on beginning, birds, concern, death, funerals, and planning

Paraphrased: When Chuang Tzu was about to die, his disciples began planning a splendid funeral. However some disciples expressed concern that given a particular arrangement, birds and kites would eat his remains. Chuang Tzu replied, "Well, above ground I shall be eaten by crows and kites, below it by ants and worms. What do you have against birds?"

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 32:14, pp. 233-234

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on control, heart, and needs

When the shoe fits, the foot is forgotten. When the belt fits, the belly is forgotten. When the heart is right, "for" and "against" are forgotten. No drives, no compulsions, no needs, no attractions: Then your affairs are under control. You are a free man.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, 19:12, pp. 166-167

Contributed by: Zaady

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