Chuang Tzu

c.360 BC - c. 275 BC

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang

Am I a human dreaming I am a butterfly or a butterfly dreaming I am a human?

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Orchidice

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on silence, words, and taoism

Tao is beyond words and beyond things. It is not expressed either in word or in silence. Where there is no longer word or silence Tao is apprehended.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (25:11, p. 226)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on chance, silence, words, and taoism

To name Tao is to name nothing. Tao is not the name of (something created). "Cause" and "chance" have no bearing on the Tao. Tao is a name that indicates without defining. Tao is beyond words and beyond things. It is not expressed either in word or in silence. Where there is no longer word or silence Tao is apprehended.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 25:11, p. 226

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on colors, desires, enemies, failure, happiness, heart, life, love, men, nature, and originality

Love of colors bewilders the eye and it fails to see right. Love of harmonies bewitches the ear, and it loses its true hearing. Love of perfumes fills the head with dizziness. Love of flavors ruins the taste. Desires unsettle the heart until the original nature runs amok. These five are enemies of true life. Yet these are what men of discernment claim to live for. They are not what I live for. If this is life, then pigeons in a cage have found happiness!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (12:15, p. 118)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on acting, blindness, colors, confusion, good, honor, kindness, knowledge, love, lust, men, music, play, reason, rest, vision, wisdom, and world

You train your eye and your vision lusts after color. You train your ear, and you long for delightful sound. You delight in doing good, and your natural kindness is blown out of shape. You delight in righteousness, and you become righteous beyond all reason. You overdo liturgy, and you turn into a ham actor. Overdo your love of music, and you play corn. Love of wisdom leads to wise contriving. Love of knowledge leads to faultfinding. If men would stay as they really are, taking or leaving these eight delights would make no difference. But if they will not rest in their right state, the eight delights develop like malignant tumors. The world falls into confusion. Since men honour these delights, and lust after them, the world has gone stone-blind. When the delight is over, they still will not let go of it. . . .

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (11:1-2, pp. 103-104)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on choice, control, fashion, force, mind, pity, possessions, power, and world

When he tries to extend his power over objects, those objects gain control of him. He who is controlled by objects loses possession of his inner self... Prisoners in the world of object, they have no choice but to submit to the demands of matter! They are pressed down and crushed by external forces: fashion, the market, events, public opinion. Never in a whole lifetime do they recover their right mind!... What a pity!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (23:8 and 24:4, p. 202, 211)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on blindness, caring, gold, mind, needs, power, skill, and winning

When an archer is shooting for nothing, he has all his skill. If he shoots for a brass buckle, he is already nervous. If he shoots for a prize of gold, he goes blind or sees two targets - He is out of his mind! His skill has not changed. But the prize divides him. He cares. He thinks more of winning than of shooting- And the need to win drains him of power.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, 19:4, p. 158

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on composers, death, departure, friendship, funerals, laughter, life, people, songs, understanding, work, and world

Three Friends There were three friends Discussing life. One said: "Can we live together and know nothing of it? Work together and produce nothing? Can people fly around in space and still forget to exist World without end?" The three friends looked at each other and burst out laughing. They had no explanation. Thus they were better friends than before. Then one friend died. Confucius sent a disciple to help the other two Chant the traditional funeral ritual. His disciple found that one of them had composed a song. While the other played the lute, They sang: "Hey, Sung Hu! Where'd you go? You have gone Where you were before. And we are here-- Damn it! We are here!" Then the disciple of Confucius burst in on them and exclaimed: "May I inquire where in the funeral ritual it allows you to sing so irreverently in the presence of the departed?" The two friends looked at each other, smiled, and said: "Well trained in liturgy, but the poor fellow doesn't understand life and death!"

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, Three Friends

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, destruction, life, past, sage, teaching, present, and world

Nu Yu was teaching Pü-liang I to be a sage. It was three days before he was able to transcend this world. After he transcended this world I waited for seven days more, and then he was able to transcend all material things. After he transcended all material things, I waited for nine days more and he was able to transcend all life. Having transcended all life, he became as clear and bright as the morning. Having become as clear and bright as the morning, he was able to see the One. Having seen the One, he was then able to abolish the distinction of past and present. Having abolished the past and present, he was then able to enter the realm of neither life nor death. Then, to him, the destruction of life did not mean death and the production of life did not mean life . . .

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on destruction and tranquility

To him everything was in process of destruction, everything was in process of construction. This is called tranquility in disturbance. Tranquility in disturbance means that it is especially in the midst of disturbance that [tranquility] becomes perfect.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

Contributed by: Zaady

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