Charles Lamb

1775 - 1834

A Quote by Charles Lamb

To live with them is far less sweet Than to remember thee.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: I Saw thy Form.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on beauty, pain, and sports

To sigh, yet feel no pain; To weep, yet scarce know why; To sport an hour with Beauty's chain, Then throw it idly by.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: The Blue Stocking.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb

You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will, But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Farewell! But whenever you welcome the Hour.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on memory, secrets, and soul

And the tear that we shed, though in secret it rolls, Shall long keep his memory green in our souls.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Oh breathe not his Name.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on harmony

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Sentimentally I am disposed to harmony; but organically I am incapable of a tune.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: A Chapter on Ears.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb

But the trail of the serpent is over them all.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Paradise and the Peri.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on companions, familiarity, and schools

I have had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days. All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Old Familiar Faces.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on dreams, life, and love

But there 's nothing half so sweet in life As love's young dream.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Love's Young Dream.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on darkness and people

Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea! Jehovah has triumph'd, - his people are free.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Sound the Loud Timbrel.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on beginning, justice, love, pleasure, sons, and vulgarity

Fly not yet; 't is just the hour When pleasure, like the midnight flower That scorns the eye of vulgar light, Begins to bloom for sons of night And maids who love the moon.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Fly not yet.

Contributed by: Zaady

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