Charles Lamb

1775 - 1834

A Quote by Charles Lamb on death, devil, holidays, inventions, spirit, and work

Who first invented work, and bound the free And holiday-rejoicing spirit down . . . . To that dry drudgery at the desk's dead wood? . . . . Sabbathless Satan!

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Work.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on anguish, earth, heaven, and sorrow

Here bring your wounded hearts, here tell your anguish; Earth has no sorrow that Heaven cannot heal.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Come, Ye Disconsolate.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on books, fiction, history, and traditions

I like you and your book, ingenious Hone! In whose capacious all-embracing leaves The very marrow of tradition 's shown; And all that history, much that fiction weaves.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: To the Editor of the Every-Day Book.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on boldness and garden

A garden was the primitive prison, till man, with Promethean felicity and boldness, luckily sinned himself out of it.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on beauty, business, christianity, communication, death, garden, god, good, heart, inventions, language, paradise, silence, simplicity, and world

What a dead thing is a clock, with its ponderous embowelments of lead and brass, its pert or solemn dullness of communication, compared with the simple altar-like structure and silent heart-language of the old sundials! It stood as the garden god of Christian gardens. Why is it almost everywhere vanished? If its business-use be superseded by more elaborate inventions, its moral uses, its beauty, might have pleaded for its continuance. It spoke of moderate labours, of pleasures not protracted after sunset, of temperance, and good hours. It was the primitive clock, the horologue of the first world. Adam could scare have missed it in Paradise.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Essays, 1823

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on books and mind

in

She unbent her mind afterwards---over a book.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on good and love

in

It is good to love the unknown.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Valentine's Day.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on silence

in

Gone before To that unknown and silent shore.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Hester. Stanza 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on society

in

He might have proved a useful adjunct, if not an ornament to society.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: Captain Starkey.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Lamb on world

in

There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: The Meeting of the Waters.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content