Charles Dickens

1812 - 1870

A Quote by Charles Dickens

I wants to make your flesh creep.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Pickwick Papers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on mankind

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I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies!

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Bleak House

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on genius

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Eccentricities of genius.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Pickwick Papers.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on rest

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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: A Tale of Two Cities

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on melancholy, men, and truth

It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Bleak House

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on heart

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"There are strings," said Mr. Tappertit, " . . . in the human heart that had better not be wibrated."

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: The Old Curiosity Shop.

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on blush, questions, and retirement

Stranger, pause and ask thyself the question, Canst thou do likewise? If not, with a blush retire.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Edwin Drood

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A Quote by Charles Dickens on day and god

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The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the God of day goes down upon the dreary scene, and in short you are for ever floored.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: David Copperfield

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on acting, brevity, caring, change, confusion, departure, familiarity, and time

Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast. If a man habituated to a narrow circle of cares and pleasures, out of which he seldom travels, step beyond it, though for never so brief a space, his departure from the monotonous scene on which he has been an actor of importance would seem to be the signal for instant confusion. . . . The mine which Time has slowly dug beneath familiar objects is sprung in an instant; and what was rock before, becomes but sand and dust.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on friendship

"Do not repine, my friends," said Mr. Pecksniff, tenderly. "Do not weep for me. It is chronic."

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Martin Chuzzelwit.

Contributed by: Zaady

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