Charles Dickens

1812 - 1870

A Quote by Charles Dickens on good and words

in

Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, all very good words for the lips,-especially prunes and prism.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Little Dorrit.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on action and world

This is a world of action, and not for moping and droning in.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on life

in

Life is made of ever so many partings welded together.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Great Expectations.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on evil, good, improvement, men, and nature

Every man, however obscure, however far removed from the general recognition, is one of a group of men impressible for good, and impressible for evil, and it is in the nature of things that he cannot really improve himself without in some degree improving other men.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on good and women

in

Tongue; well that's a wery good thing when it an't a woman.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens

He 's tough, ma'am, - tough is J. B.; tough and devilish sly.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Dombey and Son.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on passion

in

There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: Oliver Twist.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on fatherhood and maxims

It was a maxim with Foxey - our revered father, gentlemen - "Always suspect everybody."

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Source: The Old Curiosity Shop.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on angels, brothers, chance, darkness, death, friendship, grief, heart, hope, impulses, justice, losing, love, mercy, needs, prayer, purity, sorrow, spirit, timidity, truth, work, and youth

things that never die The pure, the bright, the beautiful That stirred our hearts in youth, The impulses to wordless prayer, The streams of love and truth, The longing after something lost, The spirit's yearning cry, The striving after better hopes- These things can never die. The timid hand stretched forth to aid A brother in his need; A kindly word in grief's dark hour That proves a friend indeed; The plea for mercy softly breathed, When justice threatens high, The sorrow of a contrite heart- These things shall never die. Let nothing pass, for every hand Must find some work to do, Lose not a chance to waken love- Be firm and just and true. So shall a light that cannot fade Beam on thee from on high, And angel voices say to thee- "These things shall never die."

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Charles Dickens on change, nature, progress, seasons, and time

Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own; and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark their progress.

Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870)

Contributed by: Zaady

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