Blaise Pascal

1623 - 1662

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on chaos, errors, glory, judgment, novelty, shame, truth, uncertainty, and universe

What a chimera then is man! What a novelty! What a monster, what a chaos, what a subject of contradiction, what a prodigy! Judge of all things, feeble earthworm, depository of truth, a sink of uncertainty and error, the glory and the shame of the universe.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées, chapter x. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on diversity, intuition, love, and mind

There are two types of mind . . . the mathematical, and what might be called the intuitive. The former arrives at its views slowly, but they are firm and rigid; the latter is endowed with greater flexibility and applies itself simultaneously to the diverse lovable parts of that which it loves.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Discours sur les passions de l'amour. 1653.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on fatherhood and leisure

Reverend Fathers, my letters did not usually follow each other at such close intervals, nor were they so long. , , , This one would not be so long had I but the leisure to make it shorter.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Lettres provinciales.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on nature, secrets, and understanding

For after all what is man in nature? A nothing in relation to infinity, all in relation to nothing, a central point between nothing and all and infinitely far from understanding either. The ends of things and their beginnings are impregnably concealed from him in an impenetrable secret. He is equally incapable of seeing the nothingness out of which he was drawn and the infinite in which he is engulfed.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on nature, secrets, and understanding

What is man in nature? Nothing in relation to the infinite, all in relation to nothing, a mean between nothing and everything and infinitely far from understanding either. The ends of things and their beginnings are impregnably concealed from him in an impenetrable secret. He is equally incapable of seeing the nothingness out of which he was drawn and the infinite in which he is engulfed.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on nature and thinking

Man is but a reed, the weakest in nature, but he is a thinking reed.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on god, heart, perception, and reason

It is the heart which perceives God and not the reason.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on death and honor

Whoever would not die to preserve his honor would be infamous.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on chastity, humility, men, and skepticism

Few men speak humbly of humility, chastely of chastity, skeptically of skepticism.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on eternity and silence

[I feel] engulfed in the infinite immensity of spaces whereof I know nothing, and which know nothing of me. I am terrified. The eternal silence of these infinite spaces alarms me.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

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