Blaise Pascal

1623 - 1662

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on certainty, time, and worry

We do not worry about being respected in towns through which we pass. But if we are going to remain in one for a certain time, we do worry. How long does this time have to be?

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on beginning, belief, christ, divinity, god, grace, mind, and peace

If we let ourselves believe that man began with divine grace, that he forfeited this by sin, and that he can be redeemed only by divine grace through the crucified Christ then we shall find a peace of mind never granted to philosophers. He who cannot believe is cursed, for he reveals by his unbelief that God has not chosen to give him grace.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on world

in

Cleopatra's nose, had it been shorter, the whole face of the world would have been changed.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on truth

in

Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the lack of contradiction a sign of truth.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal

We are usually convinced more easily by reasons we have found ourselves than by those which have occurred to others.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on play and tennis

Let no one say that I have said nothing new . . . the arrangement of the subject is new. When we play tennis, we both play with the same ball, but one of us places it better.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: Pensées. 1670.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on meaning and words

Words differently arranged have a different meaning and meanings differently arranged have a different effect.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Source: W. H. Auden and L. Kronenberger (eds.) The Viking Book of Aphorisms, New York: Viking Press, 1966.

Contributed by: Zaady

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