Bertrand Russell

1872 - 1970

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on awareness, education, facts, future, greatness, individuality, intelligence, knowledge, life, mind, organize, past, people, power, religion, present, time, value, and wishes

If I had the power to organize higher education as I should wish it to be, I should seek to substitute for the old orthodox religions - which appeal to few among the young, and those as a rule the least intelligent and the most obscurantist - something which is perhaps hardly to be called religion, since it is merely a focusing of attention upon well-ascertained facts. I should seek to make young people vividly aware of the past, vividly realizing that the future of man will in all likelihood be immeasurably longer than his past, profoundly conscious of the minuteness of the planet upon which we live and of the fact that life on this planet is only a temporary incident; and at the same time with these facts which tend to emphasize the insignificance of the individual, I should present quite another set of facts designed to impress upon the mind of the young the greatness of which the individual is capable, and the knowledge that throughout all the depths of stellar space nothing of equal value is known to us. . . .

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Conquest of Happiness

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on babies, day, history, schools, and words

I found, one day in school, a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: 'The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that's fair.' In these words he epitomized the history of the human race.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Education and the Social Order

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on citizenship and democracy

To acquire immunity to eloquence is of the utmost importance to the citizens of a democracy.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on happiness, intelligence, and men

The main thing needed to make men happy is intelligence.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on certainty, knowledge, and men

What men really want is not knowledge but certainty.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on chance and laws

How dare we speak of the laws of chance? Is not chance the antithesis of all law?

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Calcul des probabilités.

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on death, fear, life, and love

To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on life and theory

Upon hearing via Littlewood an exposition on the theory of relativity: To think I have spent my life on absolute muck.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: J.E. Littlewood, A Mathematician's Miscellany, Methuen and Co. ltd., 1953.

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on good and teachers

A good notation has a subtlety and suggestiveness which at times make it almost seem like a live teacher.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: J. R. Newman (ed.) The World of Mathematics, New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956.

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on brevity, circumstances, experience, fate, fear, greatness, happiness, individuality, joy, life, limitations, mind, perception, slavery, soul, universe, value, and world

A man who has once perceived, however temporarily and however briefly, what makes greatness of soul, can no longer be happy if he allows himself to be petty, self-seeking, troubled by trivial misfortunes, dreading what fate may have in store for him. The man capable of greatness of soul will open wide the windows of his mind, letting the winds blow freely upon it from every portion of the universe. He will see himself and life and the world as truly as our human limitations will permit; realizing the brevity and minuteness of human life, he will realize also that in individual minds is concentrated whatever of value the known universe contains. And he will see that the man whose mind mirrors the world becomes in a sense as great as the world. In emancipation from the fears that beset the slave of circumstance he will experience a profound joy, and through all the vicissitudes of his outward life he will remain in the depths of his being a happy man.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Conquest of Happiness

Contributed by: Zaady

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