Bertrand Russell

1872 - 1970

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on happiness, intelligence, and men

The main thing needed to make men happy is intelligence.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on certainty, knowledge, and men

What men really want is not knowledge but certainty.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on chance and laws

How dare we speak of the laws of chance? Is not chance the antithesis of all law?

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Calcul des probabilités.

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on death, fear, life, and love

To fear love is to fear life, and those who fear life are already three parts dead.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on losing

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It's not what you have lost, but what you have left that counts.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on god, good, love, and thought

I did not know I loved you until I heard myself telling so, for one instance I thought, "Good God, what have I said?" and then I knew it was true.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on acceptance, certainty, discovery, expectation, faith, kindness, knowledge, mathematics, people, religion, rest, security, teachers, thought, work, and world

I wanted certainty in the kind of way in which people want religious faith. I thought that certainty is more likely to be found in mathematics than elsewhere. But I discovered that many mathematical demonstrations, which my teachers expected me to accept, were full of fallacies, and that, if certainty were indeed discoverable in mathematics, it would be in a new field of mathematics, with more solid foundations than those that had hitherto been thought secure. But as the work proceeded, I was continually reminded of the fable about the elephant and the tortoise. having constructed an elephant upon which the mathematical world could rest, I found the elephant tottering, and proceeded to construct a tortoise to keep the elephant from falling. But the tortoise was no more secure than the elephant, and after some twenty years of very arduous toil, I came to the conclusion that there was nothing more that I could do in the way of making mathematical knowledge indubitable.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Portraits from Memory.

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on brevity, circumstances, experience, fate, fear, greatness, happiness, individuality, joy, life, limitations, mind, perception, slavery, soul, universe, value, and world

A man who has once perceived, however temporarily and however briefly, what makes greatness of soul, can no longer be happy if he allows himself to be petty, self-seeking, troubled by trivial misfortunes, dreading what fate may have in store for him. The man capable of greatness of soul will open wide the windows of his mind, letting the winds blow freely upon it from every portion of the universe. He will see himself and life and the world as truly as our human limitations will permit; realizing the brevity and minuteness of human life, he will realize also that in individual minds is concentrated whatever of value the known universe contains. And he will see that the man whose mind mirrors the world becomes in a sense as great as the world. In emancipation from the fears that beset the slave of circumstance he will experience a profound joy, and through all the vicissitudes of his outward life he will remain in the depths of his being a happy man.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: The Conquest of Happiness

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on achievement and happiness

Happiness is not best achieved by those who seek it directly.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on feeling, happiness, inspiration, philosophy, and unhappiness

If a philosophy is to bring happiness it should be inspired by kindly feelings. Marx pretended that he wanted the happiness of the proletariat; what he really wanted was the unhappiness of the bourgeois.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Contributed by: Zaady

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