Benjamin Franklin

1706 - 1790

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on wives

in

A little house well filled, A little field well tilled, And a little wife well willed, Are great riches.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Poor Richard’s Almanac

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on approval, guilt, innocence, maxims, and suffering

That it is better 100 guilty persons should escape than that one innocent person should suffer, is a maxim that has been long and generally approved.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on lies and truth

in

Half a truth is often a great lie.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on business and good

If you can't pay for a thing, don't buy it. If you can't get paid for it, don't sell it. Do this, and you will have calm and drowsy nights, with all of the good business you have now and none of the bad.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on christmas, conscience, and good

A good conscience is a continual Christmas.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on friendship, good, money, promises, and time

Remember this saying, The good payer is lord of another man's purse. He that is known to pay punctually and exactly to the time he promises, may at any time, and on any occasion, raise all the money his friends can spare.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on execution and laws

Laws too gentle are seldom obeyed; too severe, seldom executed.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on force

in

There is always room for the man of force.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on friendship

Make use of your friends by being of use to them.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on enemies and friendship

You and I were long friends: you are now my enemy, and I am yours.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: Letter to William Strahan, July 5, 1775.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content