Arnold Mindell

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

Frequently we're asked to come in when the Tao is conflict and crisis. We encourage people to let that Tao happen and not repress it. Especially in new age circles, people just hate conflict and try to repress it.

Arnold Mindell

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

Everyone is a Taoist at heart.  Everyone would like to follow nature, but we don't have enough tools yet to put the philosophy into practice... as soon as someone gets sick, they fight the illness, rather than trying to find out the meaning or purpose behind it.

Arnold Mindell

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

Darkness, whether in mood or in night, is natural.  So if we flow with the black bile of melancholia and endure the terrible darkness of depression, eventually we will break through into the light of joy.  This is the Tao (the Way) of darkness or depression--this is the Mystery of its evolution.

Arnold Mindell

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Arnold Mindell on dreaming


In "The Dreammaker's Apprentice", Arny Mindell says

"...I also know for sure that without dreams, we would have no sense of relativity about our consensus reality.  We need dreams and the Dreaming to observe the everyday world.  Likewise, without consensus reality and dreams, Dreaming could never know itself.  Life would be simply a constant flow.  Perhaps there would only be God-intoxicated states, and no "one" to appreciate these states of being.  Perhaps the Dreammaker loves creating individual dream parts, life forms, people and objects, to know Itself in infinite detail and endless permutations.

In any case, Dreaming creates personality.  Every moment something is dreaming you up by marginalizing the unitary world, making you feel as if there is a you, and everything else is not you or nonexistent.  Dreaming, the Aboriginal Dreamtime, gets marginalized.  And then you can only imagine yourself to be this single, solitary person.

However, if you meditate and expand your awareness, you notice that, actually, you and all "your" thoughts are not created by you.  You know that you arise, you are created, and your thoughts arise.  Suddenly you get the impression that Dreaming is the real thing, not you!  You are an illusion created by Dreaming and Its temporary marginization of everything else as not-you.  That is why I am saying that to understand anything about yourself, and especially about your dreams, you need access to Dreaming and to that grand incomprehensible essence, the Dreammaker.  This cosmic intelligence that makes me think I'm a person by forgetting itself...."

Arnold Mindell

Source: The Dreammaker's Apprentice

Contributed by: Bird

A Quote by Arnold Mindell on good ideas

In the dream there was a whole group of people.  Each one of them got up and did something different.  I was very surprised that in this graduating class each person did something different.

In front of the group?

In front of the group.  Ah!  And they prepared it ahead of time. [She laughs]  That's exactly what I told you I would like to do!

And they each showed themselves!

Yeah!

Yes, the dream got over the edge.  Now you helped me to explain something I was just going to say; namely, that most of our dreams occur over the edge.  Dreams are pictures of states trying to happen.  Here, on the other side of the edge, is where you are dreaming!  You are not just dreaming in a random way.  Your dreams are highly organized by your edges.  We rarely dream directly about the edge itself, but usually dream over the edge.

[To the group]  You see, in Pam's dreams people are already over the edge doing what they need to, showing themselves, being visible.  Thus, asking about dreams is a method of going over the edges.

I promise to use as little technical vocabulary as possible.  But we shall need the term "primary process" to describe the state of hiding under the basket.  The primary process is the state or way you identify yourself, and the secondary process is how we describe the behavior on the other side, the behavior which is connected to the new identity.

Your body symptoms all occur in the battleground between the identities.  They are part of the edge phenomenon.  If you want to create a body symptom, by the way, the thing to do is to reach and edge and not go over it.  It's the shortest way of getting sick if you want to try it.  Of course, we're trying it all the time!

Since we now know the program for getting sick, we also know how to get well.  All we have to do, in principle, is reverse the program.  Instead of staying behind the edge we have to go over it.

Arnold Mindell

Source: Riding the Horse Backwards

Contributed by: Bird

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

All I know for sure is that dreams are the pictures of states wanting to turn into processes.  Dreams are maps of the beginning of an otherwise unchartered trip into the unknown.  They are pictures of the unknown which appear in many channels.  Because process work is body-oriented, I put a stress upon feelings, but dreams are not pictures of just feelings; they are pictures of the way the unknown is showing itself in a given moment.

Arnold Mindell

Source: Riding the Horse Backwards

Contributed by: Bird

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

We are neither this way nor that; we are a body which is in the midst of change and evaporating.  We are timeless, thousands of years old, and involved with processes which go beyond our present identity.  This gives us an eternal feeling, but one which is realizable right here in the moment.

Arnold Mindell

Source: Riding the Horse Backwards

Contributed by: Bird

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

I look for the spirit of the incomprehensible statement, gesture or error and then care for it and let it unfold.  I will soon share with you technical details about how this incomprehensible signal appears and how to work with it, but just let me stress here, at the outset, that the gold lies in the messages which we do not intend to send.

Caring for the absurd and impossible is like believing the world is flat.  Following the unwanted, unintended message goes against collective belief, which says that if you follow the unknown, it will lead you off the edge of the known world.  We all think that when we get to the edge of the known world, we will surely fall off.  But process work shows the roundness of our universe.  It shows that if we have the courage to follow unintentional signals to their edges, we do not fall off, but discover new worlds.

Indeed, those of you who have ventured a bit into the impossible know that the world is really round, and that this roundness is a momentous discovery.  Life is so round!  Even near death you sense yourself going on.  At the edge, things transform and new worlds open up.

Thus the process-oriented approach is interesting because you must reverse your normal mode of consciousness, or, to use a metaphor, you need to ride a horse backwards.  One of the Native American tribes had a funny trickster figure who was a little strange.  He was allowed to stay in the tribe as long as he could be called "the reversed one," the one who did everything differently.  His horse went forwards but he did everything in a reversed position, facing backwards.

Riding the horse backwards means saying to life, "Yes, it's
impossible," but also, "How interesting this disease might be."  You go forwards in a backwards way.  Normally you think death is awful, but in a reversed and heretical way you could also think that death might teach you something.  It could even be exciting! You say "no" to pain, and then, when nothing else works, try saying "yes" to pain.  You'll jump for joy and grin when trouble turns into something interesting.  It's mercurial fun.  It's like a religious experience or the ability to be negative.  In the process work paradigm there is a complex "yes" to the world as a potential, as a seed for  something trying to unfold.

Arnold Mindell

Source: Riding the Horse Backwards

Contributed by: Bird

A Quote by Arnold Mindell

Some Aboriginal peoples describe Dreaming in terms of the dark side of the moon.  When the moon is not quite full, you see its bright, illuminated side.  You might call it a half moon.  But if you look closely on a clear evening, you can see the dark side, silently shimmering next to the more apparent bright side.  Like me, most people focus only on the bright side and miss the moon's dark face, that is, the Dreaming reality.
The bright side is only that portion of the whole moon that is illuminated.  Focusing only on the bright side of the moon and ignoring the dark side might easily make you think that dark side does not exist, while in fact we need the dark side to represent the whole moon.
The same is true for everything you see.  If you only focus on everyday reality, you neglect the Dreaming.  According to Aboriginal thinking, the Dreaming is the basic substance of the material world.  The Dreaming gives objects the energy that attracts and repels your attention.  If you neglect the Dreaming, you devalue the material environment because you ignore its basis and thus miss half of life.
The power of  the Dreaming is right here, behind the everyday world, as part of every object, the part you sometimes forget to notice.  From the Aboriginal perspective, everyday reality is the bright side of the moon pointing to the power of Dreaming, the moon's dark side.
In spite of my interest and long background in therapy, dreams, and shamanism, I had unconsciously assumed that the busy city and tall buildings killed the Dreaming.  That is probably why, whenever possible, I escaped to the countryside in search of Nature's pristine powers.
Uncle Lewis showed me that the city's reality exists because of the Dreaming.  Without it, nothing would be.  Dreaming is the energy behind everything; it is the life force of all living beings, the power of trees and plants, and the powers of motors, business, and financial centers.
An artist sense the Dreaming in the canvas, paper, and stone and knows that everyday reality is not only concrete.  Leonardo da Vinci wrote that artists should look into peeling plaster walls until they can see images emerging from the shapes of the plaster.  Similarly, Michelangelo called sculpting a processs of bringing out the form that already exists inside the stone.  Artists and aboriginal peoples have developed the ability to see the Dreaming, that is, the power behind the figures you see in your nighttime dreams and everyday reality

Arnold Mindell

Source: Dreaming While Awake

Contributed by: Bird

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