Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

1860 - 1904

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on death and time

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I am dying. I haven't drunk champagne for a long time.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

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A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on nature

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In nature a repulsive caterpillar turns into a lovely butterfly. But with humans it is the other way around: a lovely butterfly turns into a repulsive caterpillar.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on birth, change, death, love, politics, religion, and world

I still lack a political, religious and philosophical world view - I change it every month - and so I'll have to limit myself to descriptions of how my heroes love, marry, give birth, die, and how they speak.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: To Dmitry Grigorovich, October 9, 1888

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on advice, death, good, horses, nature, and reading

Critics are like horse-flies which hinder the horses in their ploughing of the soil. The muscles of the horse are as taut as fiddle-strings, and suddenly a horse-fly alights on its croup, buzzing and stinging. The horse's skin quivers, it waves its tail. What is the fly buzzing about? It probably doesn't know itself. It simply has a restless nature and wants to make itself felt - "I'm alive, too, you know!" it seems to say. "Look, I know how to buzz, there's nothing I can't buzz about!" I've been reading reviews of my stories for twenty-five years, and can't remember a single useful point in any of them, or the slightest good advice. The only reviewer who ever made an impression on me was Skabichevsky, who prophesied that I would die drunk in the bottom of a ditch.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: Quoted by Maxim Gorky in "Anton Chekhov," On Literature

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on action, dogs, god, gold, nature, needs, psychology, reading, spirituality, and water

I think descriptions of nature should be very short and always be à propos. Commonplaces like "The setting sun, sinking into the waves of the darkening sea, cast its purple gold rays, etc," "Swallows, flitting over the surface of the water, twittered gaily" - eliminate such commonplaces. You have to choose small details in describing nature, grouping them in such a way that if you close your eyes after reading it you can picture the whole thing. For example, you'll get a picture of a moonlit night if you write that on the dam of the mill a piece of broken bottle flashed like a bright star and the black shadow of a dog or a wolf rolled by like a ball, etc. . . . In the realm of psychology you also need details. God preserve you from commonplaces. Best of all, shun all descriptions of the characters' spiritual state. You must try to have that state emerge clearly from their actions. Don't try for too many characters. The center of gravity should reside in two: he and she.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: To AP Chekhov, May 10, 1886

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on disease and remedies

When a lot of remedies are suggested for a disease, that means it can't be cured.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: The Cherry Orchard

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on business, courage, justice, people, time, trust, understanding, world, and writers

My business is to be talented, that is, to be capable of selecting the important moments from the trivial ones. . . . It's about time for writers - particularly those who are genuine artists - to recognize that in this world you cannot figure out everything. Just have a writer who the crowds trust be courageous enough and declare that he does not understand everything, and that alone will represent a major contribution to the way people think, a long leap forward.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on foolishness

. . . only he is an emancipated thinker who is not afraid to write foolish things.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on happiness

There ought to be a man with a hammer behind the door of every happy man.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

Man will become better only when you will make him see what he is like.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Contributed by: Zaady

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