Angela Carter

1940 - 1992

A Quote by Angela Carter on sharing

in

Reciprocity of sensation is not possible because to share is to be robbed.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on men, men and women, and women

In the mythic schema of all relations between men and women, man proposes, and woman is disposed of.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on emotion, fatherhood, inventions, justice, life, motherhood, satisfaction, and women

Mother goddesses are just as silly a notion as father gods. If a revival of the myths of these cults gives woman emotional satisfaction, it does so at the price of obscuring the real conditions of life. This is why they were invented in the first place.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on justice and sister

Just because we're sisters under the skin doesn't mean we've got much in common.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on life and women

in

It is far easier for a woman to lead a blameless life than it is for a man; all she has to do is to avoid sexual intercourse like the plague.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on comedy, people, and tragedy

Comedy is tragedy that happens to other people.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on art, existence, kindness, life, mind, practice, and world

Fine art, that exists for itself alone, is art in a final state of impotence. If nobody, including the artist, acknowledges art as a means of knowing the world, then art is relegated to a kind of rumpus room of the mind and the irresponsibility of the artist and the irrelevance of art to actual living becomes part and parcel of the practice of art.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Angela Carter on aggression, clothes, hope, information, innocence, and seduction

Iconic clothing has been secularized. . . . A guardsman in a dress uniform is ostensibly an icon of aggression; his coat is red as the blood he hopes to shed. Seen on a coat-hanger, with no man inside it, the uniform loses all its blustering significance and, to the innocent eye seduced by decorative colour and tactile braid, it is as abstract in symbolic information as a parasol to an Eskimo. It becomes simply magnificent.

Angela Carter (1940 - 1992)

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content