Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on heart and prudence

"With ev'ry pleasing, ev'ry prudent part, Say, what can Chloe want?"-She wants a heart.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on death, life, and preparation

Oft, as in airy rings they skim the heath, The clamtrous lapwings feel the leaden death; Oft, as the mounting larks their notes prepare They fall, and leave their little lives in air.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Windsor Forest, 1713

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on doubt and silence

Be silent always when you doubt your sense.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, III, 1. 6

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on songs and thought

Then, at the last and only couplet fraught With some unmeaning thing they call a thought, A needless Alexandrine ends the song, That, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 156

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on soul

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Speed the soft intercourse from soul to soul, And waft a sigh from Indus to the Pole.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Eloisa to Abelard, 1717

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

Let spades be trumps! she said, and trumps they were.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Rape of the Lock, 1712

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on reflection and thought

Remembrance and reflection how allied! What thin partitions sense from thought divide!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 225.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on reputation

At every word a reputation dies.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Rape of the Lock. Canto iii. Line 16.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on charm, humor, husbands, and rules

She who ne'er answers till a husband cools, Or, if she rules him, never shows she rules; Charms by accepting, by submitting, sways, Yet has her humor most, when she obeys.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on passion and reason

The ruling passion, be it what it will, The ruling passion conquers reason still.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 153.

Contributed by: Zaady

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