Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on day

in

Years following years steal something every day; At last they steal us from ourselves away.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on church, fame, and god

Who builds a church to God and not to fame, Will never mark the marble with his name.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle iii. Line 285.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on men

in

Men must be taught as if you taught them not, And things unknown propos'd as things forgot.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 15.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on thinking and thought

With too much quickness ever to be taught; With too much thinking to have common thought.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle ii. Line 97. [excerpt]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

To observations which ourselves we make, We grow more partial for th' observer's sake.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 11.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

Here thou, great Anna!* whom three realms obey Dost sometimes counsel take-and sometimes tea. * Queen Anne

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Rape of the Lock, 1712

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

Let such teach others who themselves excel And censure freely who have written well.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

He best can paint them who shall feel them most.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Eloisa to Abelard, 1717, last line.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on heart and prudence

"With ev'ry pleasing, ev'ry prudent part, Say, what can Chloe want?"-She wants a heart.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on death, life, and preparation

Oft, as in airy rings they skim the heath, The clamtrous lapwings feel the leaden death; Oft, as the mounting larks their notes prepare They fall, and leave their little lives in air.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Windsor Forest, 1713

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content