Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on business, curiosity, and labor

One who is too wise an observer of the business of others, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on church, music, and words

As some to church repair, Not for the doctrine, but the music there. These equal syllables alone require, Though oft the ear the open vowels tire While expletives their feeble aid do join, And ten low words oft creep in one dull line.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 142

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on words

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Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 109.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on happiness and world

How happy is the blameless vestal's lot! The world forgetting, by the world forgot.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Eloisa to Abelard, 1717

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on rest and worth

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Worth makes the man, and want of it the fellow; The rest is all but leather or prunello.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 203.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on disease, growth, and strength

The young disease, that must subdue at length, Grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 135.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on painting

All gardening is landscape painting.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on plants

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Fix'd like a plant on his peculiar spot, To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on art and love

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How loved, how honored once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot A heap of dust alone remains of thee 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady, 1717

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on action, deed, and judgment

Judge not of actions by their mere effect; Dive to the center, and the cause detect. Great deeds from meanest springs may take their course, And smallest virtues from a mighty source.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Odyssey, book ii. line 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

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