Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on ambition, angels, and faults

Ambition first sprung from your blest abodes; The glorious fault of Angels and of Gods.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady, 1717

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on angels and men

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Men would be angels, angels would be gods.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on ambition, death, justice, life, and pride

Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things To low ambition and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us, and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of man; A mighty maze! but not without a plan.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

What dire offence from amorous causes springs! What mighty contests rise from trivial things!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Rape of the Lock, 1712, Canto i. Line 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on death, joy, pain, spirit, thinking, and thought

Wise wretch! with pleasures too refined to please; With too much spirit to be e'er at ease With too much quickness ever to be taught; With too much thinking to have common thought. You purchase pain with all that joy can give, And die of nothing but a rage to live.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays, 1720-1735, Epistle II, To Mrs. M. Blount, 1735

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on absence, death, and love

Is not absence death to those who love?

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on absence, affliction, friendship, and men

Let me tell you I am better acquainted with you for a long absence, as men are with themselves for a long affliction: absence does but hold off a friend, to make one see him the truer.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

To pardon those absurdities in ourselves which we condemn in others, is neither better nor worse than to be more willing to be fools ourselves than to have others so.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on honor, lies, and shame

Honour and shame from no condition rise; Act well your part, there all the honour lies.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 193.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on action and kindness

Not always actions show the man; we find Who does a kindness is not therefore kind.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Moral Essays. Epistle i. Line 109.

Contributed by: Zaady

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