Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on art, chance, dance, learning, and writing

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest who have learn'd to dance. 'T is not enough no harshness gives offence,- The sound must seem an echo to the sense.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 162.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

True politeness consists in being easy one's self, and in making every one about one as easy as one can.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on crime, death, heart, and love

Is it, in Heav'n, a crime to love too well? To bear too tender, or too firm a heart To act a lover's or a Roman's part? Is there no bright reversion in the sky, For those who greatly think, or bravely die?

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady, 1717

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on day

in

And make each day a critic on the last.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 12.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on kiss

in

On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore, Which Jews might kiss and infidels adore.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: The Rape of the Lock, 1712, canto II, 1. 7

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on business, curiosity, labor, and niceness

A person who is too nice as an observer of the business of the crowd, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on death, friendship, god, and good

Good God! how often are we to die before we go quite off this stage? In every friend we lose a part of ourselves, and the best part.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on beauty, conceit, improvement, and nature

Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty; it is not only needless, but it impairs what it would improve.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on contentment, learning, and reflection

Content if hence th' unlearn'd their wants may view, The learn'd reflect on what before they knew.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part iii. Line 180.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on bravery, fate, and struggle

A brave man struggling in the storms of fate, And greatly falling with a falling state.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Prologue to Mr. Addison's Cato, 1713

Contributed by: Zaady

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