Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on fame, faults, and praise

Careless of censure, nor too fond of fame, Still pleased to praise, yet not afraid to blame, Averse alike to flatter or offend, Not free from faults, nor yet too vain to mend.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 182

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books and learning

The bookful blockhead ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always list'ning to himself appears. All books he reads, and all he reads assails.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 53.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on happiness, style, and wit

But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens! how the style refines!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 220.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on agreement, chaos, confusion, earth, order, variety, water, and world

Here hills and vales, the woodland and the plain Here earth and water seem to strive again, Not chaos-like together crushed and bruised, But, as the world, harmoniously confused: Where order in variety we see, And where, though all things differ, all agree.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Windsor Forest, 1713

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on joy and soul

in

The soul's calm sunshine and the heartfelt joy.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 168.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope

Hills peep o'er hills, and Alps on Alps arise!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 32.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on contentment, happiness, and wishes

Happy the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Ode on Solitude, c. 1700

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on god, honesty, wit, and work

A wit 's a feather, and a chief a rod; An honest man 's the noblest work of God.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 247.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on words

in

Soft is the strain when zephyr gently blows, And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows; But when loud surges lash the sounding shore, The hoarse rough verse should like the torrent roar. When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw, The line too labours, and the words move slow: Not so when swift Camilla scours the plain, Flies o'er th' unbending corn, and skims along the main.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 166.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on friendship, guidance, and philosophy

Thou wert my guide, philosopher, and friend.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 390.

Contributed by: Zaady

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