Alexander Pope

1688 - 1744

A Quote by Alexander Pope on belief and justice

It is with our judgments as with our watches: no two go just alike, yet each believes his own.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on god, mankind, and study

Know then thyself, presume not God to scan; The proper study of mankind is man.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle ii. Line 1.

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on death and good

in

Here am I, dying of a hundred good symptoms.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on ambition, destruction, and patriotism

The same ambition can destroy or save, And makes a patriot as it makes a knave.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on god, honesty, and work

An honest man's the noblest work of God.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on eternity, home, hope, life, and soul

Hope springs eternal in the human breast: Man never is, but always to be blest. The soul, uneasy and confined from home, Rests and expatiates in a life to come.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle i. Line 95.

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on death and hope

in

Hope travels through, nor quits us when we die.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

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A Quote by Alexander Pope

But where's the man who counsel can bestow, Still pleased to teach, and yet not proud to know?

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 72

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A Quote by Alexander Pope on fame, faults, and praise

Careless of censure, nor too fond of fame, Still pleased to praise, yet not afraid to blame, Averse alike to flatter or offend, Not free from faults, nor yet too vain to mend.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 182

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on books and learning

The bookful blockhead ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head, With his own tongue still edifies his ears, And always list'ning to himself appears. All books he reads, and all he reads assails.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 53.

Contributed by: Zaady

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