Aldous Huxley

1894 - 1963

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on art

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The finest works of art are precious, among other reasons, because they make it possible for us to know, if only imperfectly and for a little while, what it actually feels like to think subtly and feel nobly.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Ends and Means, ch. 12, 1937.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on consequences, prosperity, and present

Such prosperity as we have known it up to the present is the consequence of rapidly spending the planet's irreplaceable capital.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

Several excuses are always less convincing than one.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

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A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on history, learning, and men

That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Collected Essays, 1959

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A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on ignorance

Most ignorance is vincible ignorance. We don't know because we don't want to know.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on good, inventions, sleep, and words

I'm pretty good at inventing phrases - you know, the sort of words that suddenly make you jump, almost as though you'd sat on a pin, they seem so new and exciting even though they're about something hypnopaedically* obvious. But that doesn't seem enough. It's not enough for the phrases to be good; what you make with them ought to be good too. *Training and instruction during sleep.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Brave New World, 1932

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on nature

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The investigation of nature is an infinite pasture-ground where all may graze, and where the more bite, the longer the grass grows, the sweeter is its flavor, and the more it nourishes.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on animals, attitude, catholicism, christianity, men, nature, and violence

Compared with that of Taoists and Far Eastern Buddhists, the Christian attitude toward Nature has been curiously insensitive and often downright domineering and violent. Taking their cue from an unfortunate remark in Genesis, Catholic moralists have regarded animals as mere things which men do right to regard for their own ends. . . .

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on behavior, divinity, nature, and tyranny

Modern man no longer regards Nature as being in any sense divine and feels perfectly free to behave toward her as an overweening conqueror and tyrant.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on prayer and work

Work is prayer. Work is also stink. Therefore stink is prayer.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

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