Aldous Huxley

1894 - 1963

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on good being, righteous egos, knowledge of what we are, spiritual exercise, suffering, yoga, faith, and belief

The Yogin and the Stoic--two righteous egos who achieve their very considerable results by pretending, systematically, to be somebody else. But it is not by pretending to be somebody else, even somebody supremely good and wise, that we can pass from insulated Manicheehood to Good Being.
Good Being is knowing who in fact we are; and in order to know who in fact we are, we must first know, moment by moment, who we think we are and what this bad habit of thought compels us to feel and do. A moment of clear and complete knowledge of what we think we are, but in fact are not, puts a stop for the moment, to the Manichean charade. If we renew, until they become a continuity, these moments of the knowledge of what we are not, we may find ourselves, all of a sudden, knowing who in fact we are.
Concentration, abstract thinking, spiritual exercises--systematic exclusions in the realm of thought. Asceticism and hedonism--systematic exclusions in the realms of sensation, feeling and action. But Good Being is in the knowledge of who in fact one is in relation to all experiences. So be aware--aware in every context, at all times and whatever, creditable or discreditable, pleasant or unpleasant, you may be doing or suffering. This is the only genuine yoga, the only spiritual exercise worth practicing.
The more a man knows about individual objects, the more he knows about God. Translating Spinoza's language into ours we can say: The more a man knows about himself in relation to every kind of experience, the greater his chance of suddenly, one fine morning, realizing who in fact he is--or rather Who (capital W0 in Fact (capital F) 'he" (between quotation marks) Is (capital I).
Faith is something very different from belief. Belief is the systematic taking of unanalyzed words much too seriously. Paul's words, Mohammed's words, Marx's words, Hitler's words--people take them too seriously, and what happens? What happens is the senseless ambivalence of history--sadism versus duty, or (incomparably worse) sadism as duty; devotion counterbalanced by organized paranoia; sisters of charity selflessly tending the victims of their own church’s inquisitors and crusaders. Faith, on the Contrary, can never be taken too seriously. For Faith is the empirically justified confidence in our capacity to know who in fact we are, to forget the belief intoxicated Manichee in Good Being. Give us this day our daily Faith, but deliver us, dear God, from belief.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 41...43

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on ending of sorrow, self-conscious organisms laws of nature, and well-being

Me as I think I am and me as I am in fact--sorrow, in other wors, and the ending if sorrow. One third, more or less, of all the sorrow that the person I think I am must endure is unavoidable. It is the sorrow inherent in the human condition, the price we must pay for being sentient and self-conscious organisms, aspirants to liberation, but subject to the laws of nature and under orders to keep on marching, through irreversible time, through a world wholly indifferent to our well-being, toward decrepitude and the certainty of death. The reamaining two thirds of all sorrow is homemade and, so far as the universe is concerned, unneccessary.

Somewhere between brute silence and last Sunday's
Thirteen hundred thousand sermons;
Somewhere between
Calvin on Christ (God help us!) and the lizards;
Somewhere between seeing and speaking, somewhere
Between our soiled and greasy currency of words
And the first star, the great moths fluttering
About the ghosts of flowers, Lies the clear place where I, no longer I,
Nevertheless remember
Love's nightlong wisdom of the other shore;
And, listening to the wind, remember too
That other night, that first of widowhood,
Sleepless, with death beside me in the dark. Mine, mine, all mind, mine inescapably!
But I, no longer I,
In this clear place between my thought and silence
See all I had and lost, anguish and joys,
Glowing like gentians in the Alpine grass, Blue, unpossessed and open.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 97..98

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on timeless, luminous bliss, deepening mystery, oneness, ever-changing event, spectacle, and spectator

One, two, three, four....The clock in the kitchen struck twelve. How irrelevantly, seeing that time had ceased to exist! The absurd, importunate bell had sounded at the heart of a timelessly present Event, of a Now that changed incessantly in a dimension, not of seconds and minutes, but of beauty, of significance of intensity, of deepening mystery.
"Luminous bliss." From the shallows of his mind the words rose like bubbles, came to the surface, and vanished into the infinite spaces of living light that now pulsed and breathed behind his closed eyelids. "Luminous bliss." That was as near as one could come to it. But it---this timeless and yet ever-changing Event--was something that words could only caricature and diminish, never convey. It was not only bliss, it was also understanding. Understanding of everything, but without knowledge of anything. Knowledge involved a knower and all the infinite diversity of known and knowable things. But here, behind his closed lids, there was neither spectacle nor spectator,. There was only this experienced fact of being blissfully one with Oneness.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 308..309

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." 

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Courtney

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"The spiritual journey does not consist in arriving at a new destination where a person gains what he did not have, or becomes what he is not. It consists in the dissipation of one's own ignorance concerning one's self and life, and the gradual growth of that understanding which begins the spiritual awakening. The finding of God is a coming to one's self."

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: debbie

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: the line that cares

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on music and silence

After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: breakbeat ninja

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on life, drugs, and society

"The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less sure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.''

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell (Perennial Classics)

Contributed by: katers

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"We cannot reason ourselves out of our basic irrationality. All we can do is learn the art of being irrational in a reasonable way."

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: moonbird

A Quote by Aldous Huxley on paradox

in

We cannot reason ourselves out of our basic irrationality.  All we can do is learn the art of being irrational in a reasonable way.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island

Contributed by: moonbird

Syndicate content