Aldous Huxley

1894 - 1963

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on total acceptance, self-knowledge, ending of sorrow, blessed experience, buddha, god, christ, and i am

Nobody needs to go anywhere else. We are all, if we only knew it, already there. If I only know who in fact I am, I should cease to behave as what I think I am; and if I stopped behaving as what I think I am, I should know who I am.
What in fact I am, if only Manichee I think I am would allow me to know it, is the reconciliation of yes and no lived out in total acceptance and the blessed experience of Not-Two.
In religion all words are dirty words. Anybody who gets eloquent about Buddha, or God, or Christ, ought to have his mouth washed out with carbolic soup. Because his aspiration to perpetuate only the "yes" in every pair of opposites can never, in the nature of things, be realized, the insulated Manichee I think I am condemns himself to endlessly repeated frustration, endlessly repeated conflicts with other sspiring and frustrated Manichees.
Conflicts and frustrations--the theme of all history and almost all biography. "I show you sorrow," said the Buddha realistically. But he also showed the ending of sorrow--self-knowledge, total acceptance, the blessed experience of Not-Two

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 40..41

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on good being, existence, and pillars of society

Knowing who in fact we are results in Good Being, and Good Being results in the most appropriate kind of good doing. But good doing does not of itself result in Good Being. We can be virtuous without knowing who in fact we are. The beings who are merely good are not Good Beings; they are just pillars of society.
Most pillars are their own Samsons. They hold up, but sooner or later they also pull down. There has never been a society in which most good doing was the product of Good Being and therefore constantly appropriate. This does not mean that there will never be such a society or that we in Pala are fools for trying to call in into existence.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 41

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on timeless, luminous bliss, deepening mystery, oneness, ever-changing event, spectacle, and spectator

One, two, three, four....The clock in the kitchen struck twelve. How irrelevantly, seeing that time had ceased to exist! The absurd, importunate bell had sounded at the heart of a timelessly present Event, of a Now that changed incessantly in a dimension, not of seconds and minutes, but of beauty, of significance of intensity, of deepening mystery.
"Luminous bliss." From the shallows of his mind the words rose like bubbles, came to the surface, and vanished into the infinite spaces of living light that now pulsed and breathed behind his closed eyelids. "Luminous bliss." That was as near as one could come to it. But it---this timeless and yet ever-changing Event--was something that words could only caricature and diminish, never convey. It was not only bliss, it was also understanding. Understanding of everything, but without knowledge of anything. Knowledge involved a knower and all the infinite diversity of known and knowable things. But here, behind his closed lids, there was neither spectacle nor spectator,. There was only this experienced fact of being blissfully one with Oneness.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 308..309

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored." 

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Courtney

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"The spiritual journey does not consist in arriving at a new destination where a person gains what he did not have, or becomes what he is not. It consists in the dissipation of one's own ignorance concerning one's self and life, and the gradual growth of that understanding which begins the spiritual awakening. The finding of God is a coming to one's self."

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: debbie

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: the line that cares

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on music and silence

After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: breakbeat ninja

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on life, drugs, and society

"The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less sure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.''

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: The Doors of Perception and Heaven and Hell (Perennial Classics)

Contributed by: katers

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

"We cannot reason ourselves out of our basic irrationality. All we can do is learn the art of being irrational in a reasonable way."

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: moonbird

A Quote by Aldous Huxley on paradox

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We cannot reason ourselves out of our basic irrationality.  All we can do is learn the art of being irrational in a reasonable way.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island

Contributed by: moonbird

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