Aldous Huxley

1894 - 1963

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

It's rather embarrassing to have given one's entire life to pondering the human predicament and to find that in the end one has little more to say than, 'Try to be a little kinder.'

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Tales of Wonder: Adventures Chasing the Divine, an Autobiography

Contributed by: mattmoes

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on attention, love, and loving

There is no formula or method. you learn to love by loving--by paying attention and doing what one discovers must be done.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on people

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People intoxicate themselves with work so they won't see how they really are.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: The Joy of Not Working: A Book for the Retired, Unemployed & Overworked

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Aldous Huxley on awareness, people, reality, and words

Every individual is at once the beneficiary and the victim of the linguistic tradition into which he has been born - the beneficiary inasmuch as language gives access to the accumulated records of other people's experience, the victim in so far as it confirms him in the belief that reduced awareness is the only awareness and as it bedevils his sense of reality, so that he is all too apt to take his concepts for data, his words for actual things.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: The Doors of Perception

Contributed by: ingebrita

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley

Never give children a chance of imagining that anything exists in isolation. Make it plain from the very beginning that all living is relationship. Show them relationships in the woods, in the fields, in the ponds and streams, in the village and in the country around it. Rub it in.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (1962)

Contributed by: WhatMoonsongs

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on kindness

It's a bit embarrassing to have been concerned with the human problem all one's life and find at the end that one has no more to offer by way of advice than 'Try to be a little kinder.'

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Emrys

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on music and express

Next to silence, that which expresses the inexpressible is music.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Stacey

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on god, society, civilization, choice, and discovery

Call it the fault of civilization.God isn't compatible with macinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilizaition has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness. That's why I have to keep these books locked up in the safe. They're smut. People would be shocked if...

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Brave New World, Pages: 234

Contributed by: Aaron

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on good being, existence, and pillars of society

Knowing who in fact we are results in Good Being, and Good Being results in the most appropriate kind of good doing. But good doing does not of itself result in Good Being. We can be virtuous without knowing who in fact we are. The beings who are merely good are not Good Beings; they are just pillars of society.
Most pillars are their own Samsons. They hold up, but sooner or later they also pull down. There has never been a society in which most good doing was the product of Good Being and therefore constantly appropriate. This does not mean that there will never be such a society or that we in Pala are fools for trying to call in into existence.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 41

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on good being, righteous egos, knowledge of what we are, spiritual exercise, suffering, yoga, faith, and belief

The Yogin and the Stoic--two righteous egos who achieve their very considerable results by pretending, systematically, to be somebody else. But it is not by pretending to be somebody else, even somebody supremely good and wise, that we can pass from insulated Manicheehood to Good Being.
Good Being is knowing who in fact we are; and in order to know who in fact we are, we must first know, moment by moment, who we think we are and what this bad habit of thought compels us to feel and do. A moment of clear and complete knowledge of what we think we are, but in fact are not, puts a stop for the moment, to the Manichean charade. If we renew, until they become a continuity, these moments of the knowledge of what we are not, we may find ourselves, all of a sudden, knowing who in fact we are.
Concentration, abstract thinking, spiritual exercises--systematic exclusions in the realm of thought. Asceticism and hedonism--systematic exclusions in the realms of sensation, feeling and action. But Good Being is in the knowledge of who in fact one is in relation to all experiences. So be aware--aware in every context, at all times and whatever, creditable or discreditable, pleasant or unpleasant, you may be doing or suffering. This is the only genuine yoga, the only spiritual exercise worth practicing.
The more a man knows about individual objects, the more he knows about God. Translating Spinoza's language into ours we can say: The more a man knows about himself in relation to every kind of experience, the greater his chance of suddenly, one fine morning, realizing who in fact he is--or rather Who (capital W0 in Fact (capital F) 'he" (between quotation marks) Is (capital I).
Faith is something very different from belief. Belief is the systematic taking of unanalyzed words much too seriously. Paul's words, Mohammed's words, Marx's words, Hitler's words--people take them too seriously, and what happens? What happens is the senseless ambivalence of history--sadism versus duty, or (incomparably worse) sadism as duty; devotion counterbalanced by organized paranoia; sisters of charity selflessly tending the victims of their own church’s inquisitors and crusaders. Faith, on the Contrary, can never be taken too seriously. For Faith is the empirically justified confidence in our capacity to know who in fact we are, to forget the belief intoxicated Manichee in Good Being. Give us this day our daily Faith, but deliver us, dear God, from belief.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Source: Island (Perennial Classics), Pages: 41...43

Contributed by: Nara-Narayana

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