Abraham Lincoln

1809 - 1865

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln

To ease another's heartache is to forget one's own.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on trying

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When you have got an elephant by the hind leg, and he is trying to run away, it is best to let him run.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln

I don't like that man. I must get to know him better.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on experience and future

We know nothing of what will happen in future, but by the analogy of experience.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech re sub-Treasury in House of Representatives, Springfield, IL, Dec. 26, 1839

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln

If I were two-faced, would I be wearing this one?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on concern, contentment, and failure

My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on cats

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No matter how much the cats fight, there always seem to be plenty of kittens.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on accidents, belief, falsehood, guilt, maxims, and truth

I believe it is an established maxim in morals that he who makes an assertion without knowing whether it is true or false is guilty of falsehood, and the accidental truth of the assertion does not justify or excuse him.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on children, fatherhood, and life

I happen temporarily to occupy this big White House. I am living witness that any one of your children may look to come here as my father's child has.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech to One Hundred Sixty-sixth Ohio Regiment, August 22, 1864

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on consequences, control, dogs, self-control, temper, time, yielding, and path

Quarrel not at all. No man resolved to make the most of himself can spare time for personal contention. Still less can he afford to take all the consequences, including the vitiation of his temper and loss of self-control. Yield larger things to which you can show no more than equal right; and yield lesser ones, though clearly your own. Better give your path to a dog than be bitten by him in contesting for the right. Even killing the dog would not cure the bite.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

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