Abraham Lincoln

1809 - 1865

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on life and success

I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed but I am bound to live the best life that I have. I must stand with anybody that stands right and part from him when he goes wrong.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, anxiety, day, past, politicians, presidency, and world

Senator [Stephen] Douglas is of world-wide renown. All the anxious politicians of his party, or who have been of his party for years past, have been looking upon him as certainly, at no distant day, to be the President of the United States. They have seen in his round, jolly, fruitful face, post offices, land offices, marshalships, and cabinet appointments, chargeships and foreign missions, bursting and sprouting out in wonderful exuberance ready to be laid hold of by their greedy hands.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech at Springfield, Illinois, July 17, 1858.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on extremism, government, people, and virtue

While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government, in the short space of four years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on peace and popularity

Avoid popularity if you would have peace.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on cats, dogs, and religion

I care not much for a man's religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on fighting

When I hear a man preach, I like to see him act as if he were fighting bees.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on destruction, enemies, friendship, and presidency

When someone asked Abraham Lincoln, after he was elected president, what he was going to do about his enemies, he replied, "I am going to destroy them. I am going to make them my friends."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed to Abraham Lincoln. Unverified.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, books, life, presidency, and soldiers

I could as easily bail out the Potomac River with a teaspoon as attend to all the details of the army. Attributed to President Abraham Lincoln by General James B. Fry.-Allen Thorndike Rice, Reminiscences of Abraham Lincoln, chapter 22, p. 393 (1886). This supposedly had been part of Lincoln's response to a young volunteer soldier who had come to Lincoln's office asking his help with a grievance. The story has been repeated in numerous books on Lincoln: Alexander K. McClure, "Abe" Lincoln's Yarns and Stories, p. 162 (1904); Ida M. Tarbell, The Life of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 2, p. 153 (1917); and Caroline T. Harnsberger, The Lincoln Treasury, p. 14 (1950).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed to President Abraham Lincoln by General James B. Fry.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on judgment

If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do, and how to do it.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: speech at the close of the Republican state convention, as candidate for US Senate, June 16, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on decisions, duty, faults, government, judgment, people, politics, purpose, questions, and resignation

If the policy of the government, upon vital questions affecting the whole people, is to be irrevocably fixed by decisions of the Supreme Court, . . . the people will have ceased, to be their own rulers, having, to that extent, practically resigned their government into the hands of that eminent tribunal. Nor is there, in this view, any assault upon the court, or the judges. It is a duty, from which they may not shrink, to decide cases properly brought before them; and it is no fault of theirs, if others seek to turn their decisions to political purposes.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

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