Abraham Lincoln

1809 - 1865

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on presidency

Seriously, I do not think I am fit for the Presidency.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on promises

We must not promise what we ought not, lest we be called on to perform what we cannot.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on prosperity

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on responsibility

You cannot escape the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it today.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on improvement and wishes

The way for a young man to rise is to improve himself in every way he can, never suspecting that anybody wishes to hinder him.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on silence

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Remarks at the Monogahela House February 14, 1861 I am rather inclined to silence, and whether that be wise or not, it is at least more unusual nowadays to find a man who can hold his tongue than to find one who cannot.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume IV, p. 209.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on cowardice, men, and silence

To stand in silence when they should be protesting makes cowards of men.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on impulses and slavery

Whenever I hear anyone arguing for slavery, I feel a strong impulse to see it tried upon him personally.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech to One Hundred Fortieth Indiana Regiment, March 17, 1865

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on mind, resolution, and success

Always bear in mind that your own resolution to success is more important than any other one thing.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on extremism, government, people, and virtue

While the people retain their virtue, and vigilance, no administration, by any extreme of wickedness or folly, can very seriously injure the government, in the short space of four years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first inaugural address (final text), March 4, 1861.

Contributed by: Zaady

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