Abraham Lincoln

1809 - 1865

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on enemies and friendship

Am I not destroying my enemies when I make them my friends?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on attitude, criticism, destruction, enemies, friendship, and presidency

President Lincoln was once criticized for his attitude toward his enemies. "Why do you try to make friends of them?" asked an associate. "You should try to destroy them." "Am I not destroying my enemies," Lincoln gently replied, "when I make them my friends?"

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, authors, danger, death, destruction, earth, expectation, force, military, nations, suicide, and time

At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide. At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? By what means shall we fortify against it? hall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, earth, force, and military

All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Bonaparte for a commander, could not by force take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ridge in a trial of a thousand years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on democracy, ideas, and slavery

As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this, to the extent of the difference, is no democracy.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume II, August 1, 1858,

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on good

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No man is good enough to govern another man without that other's consent.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: the first Lincoln-Douglas debate, at Peoria, Illinois, Oct 16, 1854

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, angels, nations, peace, presidency, success, vietnam, war, and words

I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference. NOTE: President Richard M. Nixon used similar words about his plan for peace in an address to the nation on the war in Vietnam, November 3, 1969: "If it does succeed, what the critics say now won't matter. If it does not succeed, anything I say then won't matter." - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard Nixon, 1969, p. 909.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: President Abraham Lincoln. — Francis Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, 1867

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on ability, belief, citizenship, country, departure, gold, ideas, interest, life, mountains, nations, prosperity, war, wealth, and world

I have very large ideas of the mineral wealth of our Nation. I believe it practically inexhaustible. It abounds all over the western country, from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, and its development has scarcely commenced. . . . Immigration, which even the war has not stopped, will land upon our shores hundred of thousands more per year from overcrowded Europe. I intend to point them to the gold and silver that waits for them in the West. Toll the miners from me, that I shall promote their interests to the utmost of my ability; because their prosperity is the prosperity of the Nation, and we shall prove in a very few years that we are indeed the treasury of the world. Message for the miners of the West, delivered verbally to Speaker of the House Schuyler Colfax, who was about to depart on a trip to the West, in the afternoon of April 14, 1865, before Lincoln left for Ford's Theatre. Colfax delivered the message to a large crowd of citizens in Denver, Colorado, May 27, 1865. -Edward Winslow Martin, The Life and Public Services of Schuyler Colfax, pp. 187-88 (1868).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: message for the miners of the West (SEE BELOW)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defeat, democracy, elections, laughter, newspapers, presidency, and speech

He said that he felt "like the boy that stumped his toe,-'it hurt too bad to laugh, and he was too big to cry.'" Attributed to Abraham Lincoln by John T. Morse, Jr., Abraham Lincoln, vol. 1, p. 149 (1893), referring to Lincoln's defeat by Senator Stephen Douglas in the 1858 senatorial campaign in Illinois. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, November 22, 1862, p. 131, attributed this reply to President Lincoln, when asked how he felt about the result of the New York election (where the Democratic candidate won the governorship]: "Somewhat like that boy in Kentucky, who stubbed his toe while running to see his sweetheart. The boy said he was too big to cry, and far too badly hurt to laugh." Adlai Stevenson told this story in his nationally-televised concession speech after the 1952 presidential election: "Someone asked me, as I came in, down on the street, how I felt, and I was reminded of a story that a fellow-townsman of ours used to tell-Abraham Lincoln. They asked him how he felt once after an unsuccessful election. He said that he was too old to cry, but it hurt too much to laugh."-The Papers of Adlai E. Stevenson, ed. Walter Johnson, vol. 4, p. 188 (1974). The speech was delivered at the Leland Hotel Springfield, Illinois, in the early hours of November 5, 1952.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on conservatism

What is conservatism? Is it not adherence to the old and tried, against the new and untried?

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Lincoln's Cooper Institute Address, February 27, 1860.

Contributed by: Zaady

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