Relationships | pg.3

On Staying Open (Plus a Playlist)

Dionne Elizabeth by Dionne Elizabeth | December 17th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Fitness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga

Staying openI was reminded this weekend, whilst walking through town, about the magic of staying open. Two strangers openly greeted me with big smiles, and I am ashamed to say I was consciously taken aback. But once I acknowledged it was me they were smiling at, I responded by grinning with appreciation at them (possibly scaring them, apols about that!).

See, after I moved here, I often found myself talking (or rather, trying to talk) to strangers in the street, or at bus stops, or as I queued to pay for groceries. Despite my best efforts, the funny looks I often received in return took their toll, as I assumed they were a negative reaction towards my behavior. This eventually led to me becoming more shy and reserved, and less likely to try to connect with those I met.

Is Oneness Really the Right Path?

Kaedrich Olsen by Kaedrich Olsen | December 11th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships

Oneness

Many Eastern and modern spiritual traditions claim that oneness is the pinnacle of spiritual achievement. In this sense, oneness means to connect to — and ultimately become absorbed into — a great numinous matrix. This can be likened to a drop of water returning to the ocean, as Zen traditions claim.

However, oneness can also be realized as the loss of individuality when memories and experiences become information within the Akashic records. In all of these cases, the individual that once was a human being no longer exists upon the death of the body. The essence of one’s experience and being is simply absorbed into the fold of a higher level of reality, or into a greater whole.

In the classical sense of oneness, each individual is advised to reject or remove the ego. This enables an easier assimilation into the great numinous state of oneness. This results in the loss of who you are, and all that you have gained, as an individual. However, this is not the only option open to us. We can retain our individuality and still become part of a greater whole.

4 Ways to Have a More Peaceful Evening

Kate Hanley by Kate Hanley | November 27th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Relationships

Peaceful Evening

In theory, evening is a glorious time of day — a time to eat and spend time with loved ones and then unwind before bed. In reality, though, it’s often a stress fest – feed the kids, put the kids to bed, answer some emails, fall into bed. Or simply lost time – eat whatever, channel surf, cruise the Internet, then look up and wonder how it got to be 11:30 already.

Luckily, it doesn’t take much to transform your evening hours into the respite they ought to be. Here are four of my favorite tips for a peaceful evening. I’d love to hear yours!

Stress Break: Better Breath, Better Life

Gaiam Staff by Gaiam Staff | November 23rd, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga

Take a “stress break” with yoga and dance teacher Hemalayaa. She believes that a better quality of breath will translate into a better quality of life.  Participate in a short breathing exercise of bringing your awareness to a deeper breath, and see how this can give you a deeper appreciation for being alive. This is a tool you can take with you and integrate into your daily life for rich relationships and a peaceful sense of self.

What to Do When Your Child Lies

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | November 15th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships

A reader recently wrote me to ask for advice about a common parenting problem:

My 6-year-old lies to me on a daily basis. He hides food in his room and lies about it, among other things. How can I get him to tell the truth?

I consider a child’s misbehavior to be a flashing neon sign announcing that something else is going on that needs to be addressed. In other words, the lying and deceptive behavior is a symptom of something else.

A Lesson in Compassion

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | September 24th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships

CompassionIn the east end of my city is a methadone clinic, a safe place where opiate addicts can ingest a less harmful substitute under the supervision of doctors and addiction specialists. This clinic is new, operating out of a pharmacy in a residential area.

Concerned residents, led by a university student who lives in the area, are outraged that a methadone clinic was opened without consulting the neighborhood, though it adheres to the city’s bylaw that clinics in residential areas serve no more than 40 people.

The group has taken to photographing the addicts as they come and go, which has, of course, created an environment of fear and shame among those who use the clinic, already prone, as addicts often are, to fear and shame.

These protesters insist that they’re only taking photographs so that “if crime increases,” they’ll have shots of the “likely criminals.”

The media story around this has inspired equal anger on the parts of many citizens, who have sent e-mails filled with threats and accusations to the protesters. An eye for an eye, it would seem.

How to Approach Frustrated Children

Susan Stiffelman by Susan Stiffelman | September 21st, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships

Crying child

Childhood is full of frustrating moments. Nature has designed life in such a way as to guarantee that children will have their wishes denied many times a day. Kids are small, physically disadvantaged, in need of support that isn’t always available, and desirous of all sorts of things that their caretakers determine aren’t good for them.

As loving parents, we hate it when our children cry, and we’ll jump through hoops to keep their tears at bay. We buy them the toys they can’t live without, force their big sisters to play Barbies with them, or let them stay up late even though we know they’ll be tired the next day.

But when we intervene every time our children become frustrated — believing we’re doing so out of love and care — we prevent them from learning the lesson of adaptation.

Are You Addicted to Technology?

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | July 24th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Tech, Personal Growth, Relationships

Addicted to Technology

I want to start this conversation by making the point that I am extremely grateful for the time in which I live. I love information and the many ways that we can access this information.

However, I do want to talk about a question that has been on my mind for some time: As a culture, are we addicted to technology?

Do What Works: Relationship Advice from an AcroYogi

Gaiam Staff by Gaiam Staff | July 23rd, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga

In the practice of yoga, as in life, it’s the moments when we work together that can inspire the most change in us as individuals. In this clip, Jenny Sauer-Klein, co-founder of AcroYoga, talks about the principle of doing what works. To deal with the inevitable challenges and miscommunications that happen when individuals become partners, we have to leave room for the unexpected. When we let go of assumptions and embrace the discovery of what works best between these two people at this moment, that’s when we allow the relationship — and each other — to grow.

Bottom’s Up! (aka The Sweet Spot)

Dionne Elizabeth by Dionne Elizabeth | June 20th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Relationships, Yoga

Yoga to Tone Your Glutes

©Jean Christine Cena

In this inspired new post, Dionne Elizabeth – a yoga teacher, DJ and writer who lives in Bergen, Norway – harmonizes music, blogging and yoga. Here, she shares the best yoga poses to improve your buns, which may, in true mind-body synchronicity, improve your life.

Here it is folks: We are already completely, marvelously, wildly, entirely who we were born to be.

At times this might not be clear to us, but the fact that we exist, that we are here together at this moment, and that you, dear reader, are on this page at this moment, is no coincidence. To meet each other at this point, somewhere along our separate journeys, really is absurd and wonderful. There is a reason for the particular path we happen to tread, including all its glorious and perfect sweetness, as well as the more sour, “interesting” parts. We each have a mission, a function, a purpose. So how do we live our life to honour that?